Porsche Power : 997 Stock Turbo 60-130mph Record

MITCH_997_REAR3QUARTER_blog

 

The measurement of time it takes for a car to accelerate from 60mph to 130mph has become increasingly more popular over the past few years.  This method of measuring acceleration creates a real-world benchmark that can be exercised universally.

Recently, with the help of proTUNING Freaks and our Porsche Lead Calibrator, Mitch Mckee, Greyson was able to take his Porsche 997.1 Turbo from 60-130mph in just 5.9 seconds.  Mechanically, this car is equipped with an AWE exhaust, Porsche GT2 intercoolers, Injector Dynamics ID1000 fuel injectors, and upgraded turbo inlet pipes.  All of that is tied together with a custom tune by proTUNING Freaks on E85 fuel utilizing the COBB Accessport and Accesstuner software.

Below are the two V-box screen shots showing a 6.002 second and 5.978 second run.  The previous record for a stock turbo 997.2 was right at 6.4 seconds.

16374986520_99b1454450_o 16388234148_a5d0e7e247_b

 

For perspective, here is a list of 60-130mph times of some popular enthusiast vehicles (stock):

  • BMW E39 M5 – 14.3 sec
  • Mercedes E63 AMG – 10.93 sec.
  • Ferrari Enzo – 7.3 sec.
  • Mercedes SLR McLaren – 7.24 sec.
  • Porsche 997.2 Turbo (PDK) – 8.79 sec.

A more complete list of times can be found on ToTheFloor.com

Congratulations to Greyson and Protuning Freaks!!

 

 

 

2015 STI Development : Staged Power Package Evaluation

2015 Subaru STIAs you may know, one of our public commitments following the release of the new 2015 model year VA-series chassis code Subarus (2015+ WRX and STI) was to thoroughly explore each platform and quantify our findings whenever possible.  Because the 2015 STI retained a very similar mechanical configuration to the 2008-2014 STI (GR-series chassis code), many in the community have anticipated that hardware and tuning options would be identical to the current offerings.  The idea behind our testing was to discard any existing assumptions about how the 2015 STI may compare to its older brothers and make sure that we are providing hardware and tuning solutions that exceed expectations.

Two of the prevalent issues with the GR series WRX and STI have been a “Boost Creep” problem and a fuel system that is at or beyond capacity on cars that are equipped with a turboback exhaust, especially when combined with an upgraded free-flowing intake.  This topic was previously discussed here: Subaru Tuning : A Quick Look into Boost Creep.

The key item of significance here: Airflow increases must be met by increases in fuel flow – AFR is a ratio air against fuel, by definition, and thus they must increase proportionally with each other.  We’ve previously explored how adding an intake increases airflow on the 2015 STI in a previous article, available here: 2015 Subaru STI Development Update – COBB SF Intake Testing.

COBB Tuning's 2015 STI undergoing dyno testing a COBB Tuning Surgeline in Portland, OR
COBB Tuning’s 2015 STI undergoing dyno testing a COBB Tuning Surgeline in Portland, OR

Goal:  Analyze fuel system performance when attempting to tune for a COBB Turboback Exhaust and COBB SF Intake System on a 2015 STI.  Will the factory fuel system be adequate to support this setup?

Vehicle:  COBB Tuning R&D 2015 STI (#2).  ~900 miles on odometer.  92 octane pump gas.

Method:  In order to gather numerical data for analysis, we collected datalogs from the car under wide open throttle (WOT) dyno runs, in the following tune/hardware configurations:

  • Stock (S#); Stock
  • COBB v340 Stage1 93 OTS (S#); Stock
  • COBB v340 Stage2 93 OTS (S#); COBB Turboback Exhaust
  • COBB v340 Stage2+SF 93 OTS (Experimental) (S#); COBB Turboback Exhaust + COBB SF Intake System

Conditions:  45-48 degrees F, Sea Level elevation.  COBB Tuning Surgeline, Portland, OR.

Background:  In general, while performing aftermarket tuning, a fuel injector is considered to be at their flow limits once reaching ~95% Injector Duty Cycle (IDC).  Beyond this, the amount of “off” or non-driven time for the injectors between injection events is inadequate for allowing the electrical coil within the injectors to fully discharge.  With this, the beginning of the next injection event comes earlier than anticipated, as the injector is already partially charged when the ECU begins driving it for the next injection cycle, and the net result is a flow non-linearity (usually demonstrated as a brief rich dip in air-fuel ratio).  After passing roughly 105% IDC, even with this rich-leaning non-linearity, the total window for injection in terms of time is now simply too short, and an inadequate amount of fuel is delivered to maintained the desired air-fuel ratio, so air-fuel ratios begin to go lean of targets.

What does this mean?  Past ~95% IDC, we mechanically lose control over fueling and air-fuel ratio will not be on-target.  Dangerous lean conditions will result past ~105% IDC.

Things to keep in mind:  Air density is a critical factor.  We intentionally tested in Portland winter months, where temperatures are cool and atmospheric pressures are high.  At elevation and high ambient temps, the concerns mentioned above become reduced as air mass is reduced.  Keep in mind, however, that it was still in the mid 40’s during this testing.   Injector Duty Cycles could easily be 5-15% higher if the testing were completed in a much colder area around the United States, such as New England, which has seen a long period well below frozen this winter.

Results:  OK, time for the relevant stuff.  This chart shows the logged Injector Duty Cycle during a full-throttle dyno run for each of the aforementioned configurations.  We’ve added a red line showing the 95% threshold we would ideally like to stay below.

Graph of Injector Duty Cycle (Y-axis) against Engine Speed (X-axis) for each configuration
Graph of Injector Duty Cycle (Y-axis) against Engine Speed (X-axis) for each configuration

As we can see, the issue is already borderline on the completely stock vehicle.  Subaru targets an extremely rich air-fuel ratio and the 2015 STI has been observed to be the most powerful STI to date; one has to wonder why they have not upgraded the fuel system’s capacity to match this.

With tuning (Stage1), we see that peak values are similar to stock.  We are targeting a leaner AFR but using more boost/airflow to make more power, so overall total injector usage remains similar.

At Stage2, we’re really getting up there.  The fully upgraded post-turbo exhaust hardware facilitates more airflow and we use even more injector as a result.  No NASA scientists needed on this one!  However, while Injector Duty Cycle does definitively now exceed 95% for a good portion of the run, it stays around 100% peak.  We have lost control of fueling, but we probably are not going to induce lean conditions yet, meaning the engine should not be at any significant new risk.

Stage2+SF: Uh-oh!  Now that the intake side has been freed up, we’re using a LOT more injector.  With Injector Duty Cycles peaking around 107%, we can no longer be sure that there is enough fuel available to keep a ball-park safe air-fuel ratio, let alone precise control over it.

As mentioned earlier, this would only get worse as ambient temperatures go further downwards.  While mid-40’s is definitely cold for all of the Arizonians reading along, Michigan residents are likely nodding along in full agreement.  Much of the U.S. sees sustained temperatures well below 40 F during their colder periods of the year.

Summary:  So, where does this leave us?  In short, it means that we (COBB Tuning Subaru Experts) are not comfortable offering “Stage2+SF” as a released stage package for the 2015 STI.  We know this is likely to disappoint some and confuse others, especially since the package is still offered for the GR vehicles.   However, not all is lost.  Thanks to our partnership with Injector Dynamics, we are well-positioned to now offer OTS packages that include fueling system upgrades, which have typically been “custom tune only” territory for Subarus.  Be on the lookout for an upcoming COMPLETE Stage3 package for 2015 STI that includes fuel system solutions in addition to full turboback and intake hardware!

Accessport Updates: January 2015

In our quest for World Domination, we’ve pushed out two large updates for our Accessport product line.  The extremely versatile COBB Accesport now supports the 2015 Subaru WRX CVT and Porsche 996 Turbo/X50/GT2!

2015 WRX

Rounding out USDM Subaru DIT vehicle support, 2015 WRX CVT support is now LIVE for any SUB-004 Accessport!  All new orders shipped from cobbtuning.com will be ready to go out of the box, previously sold Accessports may require a firmware update using Accessport Manager.  All Subaru Accessports now feature our Auto On/Off feature!  This allows the Accessport to power on/off automatically with the vehicle!

Porsche_996TT_blog cover

Further expanding vehicle support in the Porsche market, we are excited to announce the availability of the POR-004 Accessport, supporting the Porsche 996 Turbo/X50/GT2!!  Initially, these Accessports are available only through COBB Authorized Dealers and Protuners.

Contact your preferred dealer now to place your order!!

Mustang Ecoboost – Intake and Intercooler Evaluation!

Our Ford Expert Group has been cranking away with the Ecoboost Mustang! In this video, Braden discusses what he’s been working on with Cold Air Intake and Front Mount Intercooler upgrades!

COBB R&D Update : January 2015

We’ve been hard at work on some new products and features due out in early 2015!

Here’s a quick peak at some of the exciting upcoming releases from the Subaru and Ford Expert Groups!!

2015 WRX Tuning Results : 344 WTQ / 313 WHP

2015 WRX_George_18_blog

We have enjoyed seeing all of the 2015 WRX custom tune results being posted around the ‘net and decided to jump in with our own after a bit of playing around with our car on the Austin R&D dyno today. While this combo of parts isn’t likely to be an pre-configured OTS “StageX” package that is available from us, we try to do as much hard parts testing as we can to make sure we have a good understanding of the cars. It’s important for us to have knowledge over how the car will react to common aftermarket upgrades. No records or anything crazy but this thing is definitely one quick WRX now!

We bolted up all of the airflow mods we have on-hand for the car and decided to see what she could do. A bit more time to continue refining the tune would have likely yielded even larger results, but I quickly “chickened out” after realizing how close we were to 350 wtq. :eek:  It is likely that the connecting rods will prove to be the long-term weak spot for modified FA20DIT cars, so we decided to call it an afternoon with our engine still intact for now :cool:

Engine/Power Modifications on our WRX consist of the following: COBB Tuning Accessport V3, COBB Tuning Turboback Exhaust (Catted), COBB Tuning SF Intake/Airbox (Prototype), TurnInConcepts TGV Delete Housings, Upgraded Aftermarket TMIC.

2015 WRX Dyno Chart

Results vs stock vehicle: +77 wtq (28.8%) , +62 whp (24.6%) 

At this point this car is now making a tad more torque and horsepower than a Stage2+Intake 2015 STI on the very same dyno — very impressive for a 2.0L with diminutive factory turbo. We are slowly beginning to really like these cars now as the uncorking process continues :)

Long term, this testing helped us identify some other areas of the factory ECU where we should focus our future reverse engineering (table/logic discovery) in order to provide the precise control and ease of tunability that the COBB Protuner network demands, even as the power numbers get crazier and crazier as new mods become available over time. We can’t wait to keep pushing this platform and seeing what kind of amazing results you guys achieve over time!

Thank you for your support during the DIT craze!

Cheers

The COBB Subaru Expert Group

Porsche Testing in Japan with Mitch McKee of COBB!

 

I am a big proponent of on track testing calibration’s. We want to be sure that right out of the box you guys are getting a calibration that we are 100% with. We did this with the 997.2 Turbo, taking the car to Laguna Seca and winning the Optima Challenge with a car setup by BBI and tuned by Cobb Tuning using the Accessport.

Now for this we wanted to show the Japanese guys what American tuners are capable of! I think we did pretty good

To start off we had 2 cars to test. A 997.1 GT2 and a 997.1 GT3. The GT2 was bone stock even down to the old Michelin’s. The GT3 had some muffler deletes and suspension.

Both were beautiful cars and it really was an honor that the customers let us test them sight unseen. Creft Motorsports is a shop in Yokohama and they were very helpful in getting the cars all setup.

Both cars were faster by a large margin at Fuji Speedway. Fuji speedway may be one of the most beautiful tracks on the planet as far as I am concerned. With Mt. Fuji looming behind the track it makes for beautiful scenery.

Now on to the pics! As soon as I get a little more time I will get the video up as well. ( Be warned I am a much better engineer than photographer!)

-Mitch

Me with Fuji-San checking datalogs after coming in from a quick morning session.

997.1 GT3 AP

This is just because I love these cars so much:

Thanks for looking guys! We have some more content to put up once it is edited!

2015 Ford Mustang Ecoboost – COBB R&D is underway!

That’s right! Expect awesome power gains and tons of cool features with the COBB Accessport on your Ecoboost Mustang! Our engineers came right out of the gate and have already put a ton of work into Accesstuner Software and Accessport Firmware!

Check out the video below to see what Braden, our Ford Lead R&D Calibrator has been up to!

Nissan GT-R Rolling Launch – Dyno Testing

We’ve been testing some exciting new features for the GT-R platform!  

With roll-racing events becoming more and more popular, our Rolling Launch feature will allow cars to build boost while maintaining a constant speed.  With the release of a button, full power is on tap!

Check out this quick video of our GT-R Experts testing this new feature on our in-house dyno!


 

 

2015 WRX Rev Hang

For 2015, Subaru introduced a completely overhauled WRX!  There are some awesome new changes, like direct injection,  and other changes many aren’t too thrilled about.  Subaru’s new “Rev Hang” logic seems to top the list of complaints.  Luckily though, COBB is hard at work coming up with a solution!

What is Rev Hang?

Typically, when you are in gear and revving high into the RPM range, pressing in the clutch would result in the RPMs quickly falling.  With Rev Hang, the RPM stays constant for a bit and slowly falls.

This isn’t necessarily a bad thing.  However, many car enthusiasts are purists and feel the only inputs the car should be considering, especially when it comes to throttle, come only from the driver.  We tend to agree!

Here’s a quick video of the Rev Hang “Fix” in action:

 

This does look subtle on video but if you own or have driven a 2015 WRX, you know how big a difference this will make!  Check out the latest v111 maps to try out the fix: https://cobb.app.box.com/2015-wrx-v111.  Stay tuned to our Website, Facebook Page, Twitter, Instagram, and Blog for the latest!