Porsche Testing in Japan with Mitch McKee of COBB!

 

I am a big proponent of on track testing calibration’s. We want to be sure that right out of the box you guys are getting a calibration that we are 100% with. We did this with the 997.2 Turbo, taking the car to Laguna Seca and winning the Optima Challenge with a car setup by BBI and tuned by Cobb Tuning using the Accessport.

Now for this we wanted to show the Japanese guys what American tuners are capable of! I think we did pretty good

To start off we had 2 cars to test. A 997.1 GT2 and a 997.1 GT3. The GT2 was bone stock even down to the old Michelin’s. The GT3 had some muffler deletes and suspension.

Both were beautiful cars and it really was an honor that the customers let us test them sight unseen. Creft Motorsports is a shop in Yokohama and they were very helpful in getting the cars all setup.

Both cars were faster by a large margin at Fuji Speedway. Fuji speedway may be one of the most beautiful tracks on the planet as far as I am concerned. With Mt. Fuji looming behind the track it makes for beautiful scenery.

Now on to the pics! As soon as I get a little more time I will get the video up as well. ( Be warned I am a much better engineer than photographer!)

-Mitch

Me with Fuji-San checking datalogs after coming in from a quick morning session.

997.1 GT3 AP

This is just because I love these cars so much:

Thanks for looking guys! We have some more content to put up once it is edited!

2015 Ford Mustang Ecoboost – COBB R&D is underway!

That’s right! Expect awesome power gains and tons of cool features with the COBB Accessport on your Ecoboost Mustang! Our engineers came right out of the gate and have already put a ton of work into Accesstuner Software and Accessport Firmware!

Check out the video below to see what Braden, our Ford Lead R&D Calibrator has been up to!

Nissan GT-R Rolling Launch – Dyno Testing

We’ve been testing some exciting new features for the GT-R platform!  

With roll-racing events becoming more and more popular, our Rolling Launch feature will allow cars to build boost while maintaining a constant speed.  With the release of a button, full power is on tap!

Check out this quick video of our GT-R Experts testing this new feature on our in-house dyno!


 

 

2015 WRX Rev Hang

For 2015, Subaru introduced a completely overhauled WRX!  There are some awesome new changes, like direct injection,  and other changes many aren’t too thrilled about.  Subaru’s new “Rev Hang” logic seems to top the list of complaints.  Luckily though, COBB is hard at work coming up with a solution!

What is Rev Hang?

Typically, when you are in gear and revving high into the RPM range, pressing in the clutch would result in the RPMs quickly falling.  With Rev Hang, the RPM stays constant for a bit and slowly falls.

This isn’t necessarily a bad thing.  However, many car enthusiasts are purists and feel the only inputs the car should be considering, especially when it comes to throttle, come only from the driver.  We tend to agree!

Here’s a quick video of the Rev Hang “Fix” in action:

 

This does look subtle on video but if you own or have driven a 2015 WRX, you know how big a difference this will make!  Check out the latest v111 maps to try out the fix: https://cobb.app.box.com/2015-wrx-v111.  Stay tuned to our Website, Facebook Page, Twitter, Instagram, and Blog for the latest!

COBB at Subiefest 2014!

We’ll be heading out to Subiefest next weekend at Auto Club Speedway in Fontana, CA!

Make sure to come by the COBB booth to check out new products and enter in for your chance to win some awesome prizes!

COBB Socal will also be at Subiefest selling all of your favorite COBB parts!!

Subiefest 2014 Flyer 5 Version 3

2015 Mustang Ecoboost is now in the COBB Stable!

That’s right!  With the COBB Accessport on your Ecoboost Mustang, your equestrian skills will immediately jump from broodmare to spirited stallion!  We’re stoked too!  Our engineers came right out of the gate and have already put a ton of work into Accesstuner Software and Accessport Firmware!  We have two vehicles on order – a manual and an auto both with the Performance Package.  As soon as these two cars arrive we’ll continue development!  Just like other platforms, hard part upgrades and advanced staged Off The Shelf maps will soon follow!

If you’re new to COBB or need a refresher on what an Accessport is, check this out:

 

Stay tuned to our Facebook page, follow us on Twitter, Instagram, and of course this Blog for the latest news and updates!

Porsche Updates – Brake Boosting and Adjustable Launch Control

Porsche 997 Turbo

The most powerful Porsche tuning software available just got better!

Brake boosting and adjustable launch control are now available for 997.2 Turbo Porsches.  Brake Boosting will allow users to build boost for roll-racing events which are becoming increasingly popular.  Adjustable Launch Control offers the ability to adjust Launch RPM to maximize traction when accelerating from a dead-stop.  These features are available exclusively from COBB using the Accessport and Accesstuner Pro!  No other tuning solution can offer these performance features, ease of use, and tuning support.  Simply launch Porsche Accesstuner or Accessport Manager and run updates!

2015 Subaru STI Development Update – COBB SF Intake Testing

So, you’ve probably seen some pretty cool early results from hardware swaps on the 2015 STI platform.  But, have you seen any actual data besides some basic dyno charts with really high smoothing?  Probably not. :) Lucky for you, we’re here to provide actual quantified data behind the madness.

Many people were initially disappointed that our first release only included Stage1 maps.  This was because we prefer to *thoroughly* test parts to find out what each modification will do so that we can be sure our Staged Package offerings have a definitive gain for your investment.  For example, here is a NASIOC thread showing some of the testing we did to compare power output when a downpipe is added to a 2015 STI: http://forums.nasioc.com/forums/showthread.php?t=2639122

For intakes, we decided that looking at only power wasn’t good enough.  An age-old claim in Subaru world is that the factory airbox is not restrictive with the stock turbo, and we wanted to see it for ourselves.  We put this to the test by measuring turbo inlet vacuum generated on the stock airbox and with a COBB Tuning SF Intake system fitted to the car.  Garrett refers to vacuum in the turbo inlet as “depression”:  “Any restriction (caused by the air filter or restrictive ducting) will result in a “depression,” or pressure loss, upstream of the compressor that needs to be accounted for when determining pressure ratio.” (http://www.turbobygarrett.com/turbobygarrett/pressure_ratio)

By comparing the depression created by the factory intake against an upgraded intake, we can actually “see” if we have removed a restriction or not.  If the depression is the same, well, all we’ve done is added a noise-maker to the car :)

To complete this test, we first gathered boost and depression data on the stock airbox using a stock-hardware 2015 STI (tuning only), first on wastegate boost pressures only, then at ~17.5psi peak via our Stage1 93 OTS map in “S#” mode.  Next, we gathered the same data on the COBB SF Intake, with no calibration changes other than for the different MAF curve required.

What did we find?  Results!  The stock airbox creates depression levels of a bit over 1psi on wastegate boost at redline, and well over 2psi on the Stage1 boost levels!  What does this mean?  Here in Austin, where the elevation is ~800 ft, the barometer was ~14.21psi for the testing day.  With the stock airbox at redline, the turbo was only being fed with approximately 12psi of pressure due to the depression.  For comparison, this would be the same as running the car at 5500 ft of elevation if there were no depression!

Here is the boost and depression (intake pressure) data for wastegate and for 17.5psi, shown in gauge pressure relative to ambient atmosphere:

Boost and Intake Pressure – Wastegate Spring Only

 

Boost and Intake Pressure – 17.5psi Setting

As you can see, thanks to the reduction in depression with the upgraded intake, boost is a bit higher on the wastegate.  At 17.5psi, we can see that spool has improved and high RPM boost is held out better on the same WGDC settings.  In each case, the depression created by the COBB SF Intake system is roughly half of the factory airbox.  What does this mean?  Simply put, we’ve reduced restriction in the turbo’s inlet path, as shown by the reduction in depression.

I also decided to take this data one step further, which is to calculate the turbocharger’s effective pressure ratio for each case.  One caveat is that we’re looking at post-IC pressures, not pre-IC, but because the intercooler has not changed at all between tests, it shouldn’t skew the results too greatly.

Here is the pressure ratio for each scenario (again, baro in Austin was ~14.21psi on testing day), calculated using Garrett’s methodology here: http://www.turbobygarrett.com/turbobygarrett/pressure_ratio

Pressure Ratio Comparison – Wastegate Spring Only

 

Pressure Ratio Comparison – 17.5psi

On wastegate boost pressures, we can see that there isn’t too drastic of a difference — perhaps a tenth of a point at very most.  However, at 17.5psi, we can see the COBB SF Intake really start to separate itself: pressure ratio is decreased by about two full tenths across the board after spool.  What does this mean?  The turbocharger compressor is now operating more efficiently, at least in terms of the demanded pressure output (boost) again the amount of pressure available at the input.

So, at the end of the day, here’s what power looks like between the two.  COBB SF Intake are the solid lines, stock airbox are the dashed lines:

Stage 1 vs Stage 1+SF Intake Dyno Comparison

Long story short?  On the 2015 STI, even in otherwise-stock configuration, the COBB SF Intake system (and others that have the same or better airflow capabilities) help the turbo breathe easier and in turn, make the same boost more efficiently or more boost at the same efficiency when compared to the stock airbox.

Thanks for reading along! Hopefully you found this data interesting and helpful. We plan to keep providing results like this as we dig in further on the 2015 STI and WRX, so stay tuned :)

Cheers,

The COBB Subaru Expert Group

Suspension – Yes, you should probably upgrade that too!

We can all sometimes get a little caught up in making power…and that’s great!  But what good is all of that power if you cant put it to the ground?

Check out our latest video for a little insight into what suspension modifications you can make to improve Contact, Comfort, and Control of your car.

Then, head on over to our website to check out what suspension parts we offer for your specific vehicle!

www.cobbtuning.com/suspension

www.cobbtuning.com/suspension

Subaru Tuning – A Quick Look into Boost Creep

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Boost creep is something we tend to address quite a bit during the winter months.  Below we will go over the causes of boost creep, why you should be aware of it, and solutions to keep your boost levels in check.

Boost creep is defined as a condition of rising boost levels past what the predetermined level has been set at.   For example, if your target boost level is 15psi, you would see the boost levels increase beyond that as RPMs increase.  The short explanation for boost creep is that the wastegate is not able to flow enough air to bypass the turbocharger’s turbine housing.  When the volume of air flowing through the turbine housing continues to increase, boost will also continue to increase.  Boost creep is most commonly observed in areas that have very low ambient temperatures as well as high atmospheric pressure.  This often encompasses those in the Pacific Northwest as well as New England and East Coast.

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Boost creep is undesirable for a number of reasons.  When a car exhibits a large amount of boost creep it makes controlling the boost level next to impossible for a tuner.  A car that is on the edge can exhibit highly variable boost response under different environmental conditions.  For instance, if you have your car tuned during warmer months, the change in weather going into winter may be enough to cause a significant increase in boost.  Once the flow limit of the wastegate has been reached, exhaust gas back pressure will increase.  This is very inefficient and will cause temperatures to increase and introduce more detonation-prone conditions.

Boost Creep is not a condition that can be corrected solely by making tuning changes as it is a mechanical limitation.  The two easiest ways to address boost creep are to either port the wastegate housing of the turbocharger in order to allow it to flow more air or to switch to an external wastegate style uppipe.

If you’re looking for answers to other tuning related questions, head over to our Knowledge Base!